Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet, SC

Largest Online Outdoor
Sculpture Collection
Statue Identification, Sculptures, Directory,
Sculptor's Names, Dates, and Photos

By Patricia Blackstock

I designed this page to connect the American sculptures at Brookgreen with the sculptor, their name, sculpture information, dates and a photo. The project has been challenging and rewarding. I think this is the only on-line free directory list with well over 200 sculptures on single page, connecting Brookgreen sculptures with their sculptor.

I am constantly adding more sculptures, artists, and descriptions to this listing. If you would like to see a sculpture not listed here, please send me the name and location. I will try to locate it, take a photo, then add it to this page. Thanks to the many people who taken the time to send me an e-mail because they have a request, or because they want to share their story with me. Contact me, Patricia Blackstock. I would love to hear from you!

Brookgreen Sculpture Gardens, Murrells Inlet, is located just south of Myrtle Beach. It includes more than 9,000 acres plus a Wildlife Preserve. Brookgreen has earned accreditation from the American Association of Museums and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, as well as being designated a National Historic Landmark and being listed on the National Register of Historic Places. On July 13, 1931, Brookgreen Gardens was officially founded as the first public sculpture garden in the United States. Archer and Anna Hyatt Huntington founded Brookgreen Gardens in order to display objects of art within a natural setting. There are currently over 1500 sculptures.

Awards: 2013 - Brookgreen received the Winthrop University Medal of Honor in the Arts, which was established in 2001 to honor those who encourage the arts. In April, 2013, Brookgreen was recognized nationally as one of the top 10 public gardens om the United States by TripAdvisor.com

You are viewing Page 1: A listing of American Sulptures eith names of sculptors, dates and a photo
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Page 3. Lowcountry Zoo, Birds, Butterflies, Animals
Page 4. Special Events, Nights of a Thousand Candles, Harvest Home and more

My husband and I have been living in Myrtle Beach for 16 years, and we have always enjoyed our Annual Pass to Brookgreen Gardens.
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Mares of Diomedes - John Gurtson de la Mothe the Borglum
Seated Woman, Leonda Froelich Finke
1. Map of Brookgreen 2. Event Map. Click to enlarge the Brookgreen Gardens and Events mapse 3. Entrance to Brookgreen: Fighting Stallions by Anna Hyatt Huntington 1950, Aluminum. 4. Fountain of the Muses by Carl Milles in Bronze. The four males on the side of the pool represent branches of the fine arts. In the words of the sculptor, "Each artist carries his symbol with him. The Poet - the blue bird; the Architect his new formed column; the Musician; his old interesting instrument; the Painter (here represented by Eugene Delicroix) his flowers 5. Mares of Diomedes - John Gurtson de la Mothe the Borglum (1867 - 1941) The idea of portraying a group of horses in rapid forward movement was inspired by the sculptor's early like in the American West. This is a section of a larger group that consisted of several horses with a rider in the lead.
Field of Blue. Courtesy of the sculptor, George Lundeen
Turtle Train by Stanley Proctor
Turtle Train by Stanley Proctor
Pomona by Joseph Emile Renier
Rapehll by Bruno Lucchesi
Phryne Before the Judges by Albert Walter Wein
1. (On loan) Field of Blue. Courtesy of the sculptor, George Lundeen (B. 1948) Bronze. Lundeen received a MFA degree from the University of Illinois . A Fulbright-Hayes scholar, he achieved the status of full Academician of the National Sculpture Society. 2. and 3. The Turtle Train - Bronze by W. Stanley Proctor b. 1939. Gift of Colin S. Phials in honor of Deidre Phipps. Native Floridian W. Stanley Proctor has become adapt at depicting people and their unique traits, characteristics, and personalities, The state of Florida commemorated him and his contributions to the arts when he was inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame in 2006. (Located in the Childrens Garden.) 4. Pomona by Joseph Emile Renier (1887-1966) Tennessee marble, 1929. After studying at the Art Students League, Joseph Renier worked in the studios of A.A. Weinman and Attilio Piccirilli. In 1915, he was awarded the Prix de Rome to study at the American Academy. This sculpture was designed in 1929, and carved in marble in t he spring of 1937. 5. Raphell by Bruno Lucchesi (b. 1926) Bronze. The fountain sculpture was created after the untimely death of a young volunteer for a psychiatric hospital on Queens NY. She is depicted as receiving colance of cool water from a spring, as she provided to the hospital patients. Commissioned by her parents. 6. Phryne Before the Judges - by Albert Walter Wein (1915 - 1991) Limestone, 1948. Massive in size and presence in the landscape, this sculpture is an example of the sculptor's early work, which emphasized volume and simplification of detail. In the myth of Phryne, the Greek courtesan of legendary beauty secured an acquittal from her judges by revealing her body. This work was created when Wein Studied at the American Academy in Rome. It was subsequently enlarged for Brookgreen Gardens. 7 Seated Woman, Leonda Froelich Finke (b. 1922) Bronze, 1988. Gift of Mrs. Edward M. Rosenthal. Among the group of American artists emerging farer World War II, Leonda Froelich Finke is known for serenely expressive images of women. Her large-scale sculptures are initiated as lawyers of burlap-soaked plaster, wrapped and carved, creating form and rough surface.
The Guardian, Sahl Swarz
Joy of Motherhood - Willard Newman Hirsh
Offner Sculpture Center
Offner Sculpture Center, Richard McDermott Miller
old man reading newspaper, Derek Wernher
Flag raising on Iwo Jima)
1. (Left.) Derek Wernher's realistic old man sitting on a park bench reading a newspaper. The title of the sculpture is the pen name of the newspaper's editor, Len Ganeway. Bronze 1980. 2. Joy of Motherhood - Willard Newman Hirsh (1905-1982) Bronze - Gift of Mrs. Willard Hirsch. Infusing many of Hirsch's works in the spirit of the joy of life. The physical and spiritual bond between mother and child was a favorite theme. A native of Charleston, SC, Hirsch not only promoted sculpture through his own works, but also as an instructor, provided opportunities for children and young adults to learn the creative process 3 The Guardian, Sahl Swarz (1912 - 2004) Bronze, 1937. Sahl Swarz was one of Dorothea Denslow's students at the Clay Club in New York City. He later became associate director and was part of its evolution into the Sculpture Center. His sculptures were commissioned for government art projects in post offices and courthouses throughout the 1930s, 4. (On loan) United We Stand (Flag raising on Iwo Jima) Felix de Weldon (1907-2003) Bronze, 2001, a 13 inch study. Courtesy of the sculptor's estate. In response to the events of 9/11/2001, Felix de Weldon authorized a special edition of his sculpture, The Flag Raising on Iwo Jima, often referred to as the Marine Corps War Memorial. In de Weldon's words: "This sculpture stands as the American symbol of unity of action, the will to sacrifice, and America's relentless determination to defend freedom." 5 and 6. In his will, Richard McDermott Miller 1996-1997 left his entire collection to Brookgreen Gardens. The collection is housed in the Offner Sculpture Center, along with works of others. The heads are Miller's selfies.
Time and the Fates of Man, Paul Howard Manship
139th Psalm,
Annie's Garden
Can Can by Jane DeDecker
1. Time and the Fates of Man - Bronze, 1939 by Paul Howard Manship. Symbolic passing of time, the sundial represents the Three Fates: Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropo 2. and 3. Details from Time and the Fates of Man 3. and 4. 139th Psalm "If I take the wiings of the morning and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea; even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me." 4. Annie's Garden
Dionysus Gilt Bronze, 1936 by Edward Francis McCartan.
Don Quixote by Anna Hyatt Huntington
Sancho Panzo by Carl Jennowein
The Athlete by Rudolph Evans
Little Lady of the Sea - Brookgreen
1. Little Lady of the Sea by Earnest Bruce Haswell 1889-1956. After attending Cincinnati (Ohio) Art Academy, he studied in Brussels at the Academie Royale des Beaux-Arts. As World War I began, he came home and created war memorials for many Ohio towns. Later he specialized in fountains, sundials and bird baths. Little Lady of the Sea was acquired byBrookgreen in 1932. 2 The Saint James Triad sculpture is a subject in the book "Voices in Bronze." Richard McDermott Miller 1996-1997.
3. Dionysus Gilt Bronze, 1936 by Edward Francis McCartan. The life-size figure displays McCartan's elegant use of line, giving balance and harmony to the overall composition. 4 Don Quixote- Aluminium 1947 by Anna Hyatt Huntington. 5 Sancho Panza, Aluminium, 1971 by Carl Jennowein, commissioned by Huntington as Don Quixote's companion. 6. The Athlete (1915) by Rudolph Evans 1887-1960 represents the harmonious beauty of fine physique. The model was a javelin thrower and champion middleweight wrestler. Evans is best known for his "Thomas Jefferson " inside the Jeffferson Memorial, Washington D.C.
Tortoise Fountain, Janet Scudder (
Flute Boy - Children's Sculpture Garden
Mother and Baby Bear - Childrens Garden
Wood Nymphs
1. Tortoise Fountain, Janet Scudder (1873 - 1940) Scudder was among the first group of American artists to specialize in figures for garden settings. According to the artist, her aim was to please and amuse the world with her sculpture. Lead garden figures were part of a series of castings known as "The childhood of the Gods" designed by Wheeler Williams in 1940 and made available to the public in 1942 through such patrons as Anna Hyatt Huntington 2 Lead garden figures were part of a series of castings known as "The childhood of the Gods" designed by Wheeler Williams in 1940 and made available to the public in 1942 through such patrons as Anna Hyatt Huntington. Flute Boy 3. Mother and Baby Bear 4. Wood Nymphs, Henry Hering (1874-1949i) Aluminum, 1932.Hering worked for sculptor Philip Martiny, then studied with Augustus Saint-Gaudens, eventually becoming his assistant. (1.- 4. located in the Children's Garden.) 5. Pastoral by Edmond Romulus Amateis (1897-1891) Tennessee Marble, 1924. Amateis was drawn to the work of the Italian Renaissance. His instinct for good composition and skill resulted in important sculpture commissions. Originally titled Mirafiore, this sculpture was modeled at Rome when Amateis was a student at the American Academy. 6. Penguins by Albert Laessle (1877 - 1954) Bronze, 1917. S.1936.047
Young America
Wind on Water by Richard McDermott Miller
Grandmother Richard Blake
Orpheus and Eurydice by Nathaniel Choate
Fauns at Play by Charles Keck
1. Young America 2. Wind on Water by Richard McDermott Miller (1922-2004) Bronze, 1992. Gift of the sculptor. Known as one of the greatest American sculpture of the human figure in the post World II era, Miller explored the possibilities of composition and innovative design. Miller's award-winning work is in many important public and private collections. 3. Grandmother, from a series by Richard Blake, created to celebrate the beauty inherent in the women of Africa, South America, Mexico and Central America. 4. The Offering, by Marjorie Daingerfield (1900 - 1977). Bronze, 1973. The daughter of a painterm Elliott Daingerfield, owner of the Gainsborough Studios, Marjorie Daingerfield grew up in the New Yorkart world. She was known for portraits of individuals and notables from the stage and opera. The Offering was created for the garden of a church in Blowing Rock, NC where the family had a summer home.5. Orpheus and Eurydice by Nathaniel Choate (1899 - 1965) Bronze, 1952. The myth of Orpheus and Eurydice is a tragedy. After Eurydice's untimely death. Orpheus went to the underground to persuade Pluto to return her to him. Pluto granted the request, but warned Orpheus not to look at her until they both were in the world above - a warning he did not heed. The sculptor has captured the moment the lovers parted forever. 6. Fauns at Play by Charles Keck There are two casts of this sculpture; the original was commissioned for the estate of J. J. Raskob in Centreville, Maryland, This copy exhibited 1921 at the Architectural League in New York, acquired 1932 ny Brookgreen Gardens and placed in the gardens in 1934.
The Offering
Nature Dance Alexander Stirling
The Visionaries. Anna Hyatt Huntington
Nymph and Fawn, Carl Jennewein
Meditation by Ernest by Wise Keyser
Riders of the Dawn by Adolph Alexander Weinman
1. Nature Dance - Alexander Stirling. Limestone 2. The Visionaries. Anna Hyatt Huntington and her husband are surrounded by objects of personal interest. By Anna Hyatt Huntington 3 Nymph and Fawn won the competition for the Darlington Memorial Fountain in the Court House Square, Washington, D.C. It was acquired by Brookgreen Gardens in 1940. By Carl Jennewein in Bronze, created 1922. 4. Meditation by Ernest by Wise Keyser (1876 - 1959) Keyser studied with Saint-Gaudens at the Arts Students League and in Paris at the Academie Julian. This contemplative figure was first created for a fountain at a residence in Long Branch, NJ 5. Riders of the Dawn, by Adolph Alexander Weinman (1870 - 1952) Indiana Limestone, 1940-1942. Excelling as an architectural sculptor, Weinman created some of his finest work for public buildings. Riders of the Dawn presents the joyous spirit of a new day and youthful vigor, embodied by two powerful stallions ridden by young men. The strong muscles of the horses and riders create intricate patters of light and shade as the sun crosses the sky.6. Voratio by Jane B Armstrong (1921 - 2012) Vermont Verde antique marble, 1969. Gift of the sculptor. After careers in teaching and journalism, Armstrong began to study sculpture, and within 3 years she began to receive awards. Her subjects were primarily from nature, capturing in stone rhythms of living creatures. Armstrong depicted this sphinx caterpillar in a rounded, chunky form and gave the stone high polish.
The Afternoon of the Faun
The Thinker by Henry Clews, Jr.
Shark Diver by Frank Eliscu
Awakening by Anthony Antonios
Alligator Bender by Nathaniel Choate,
Pastoral by Edmond Romulus Amateis
1. The Afternoon of the Faun. Percy Bryant Baker (1881 - 1970) Tennesee marble, 1934. Inspired by the Nihinsky ballet of the same name, this work was designed in a small size to be cast in bronze. Anna Huntington asked Baker to enlarge the composition and carve it in stone. At first he resisted, but once he complied, he demonstrated the deliacy of modeling reserved usually for bronze casting could be recreated in stone. 2. The Thinker by Henry Clews, Jr. 1876-1937. Aluminum figure on a bronze base, 1914. Clew's satirical artistic commentary delt with aspects of society, education, government, military, family, love and art. His fascination with evil and its reflections were not well received by the public or critics. The base panel of a blowfish attacked by a group of needlefish shows the perennial struggle between the artist, puffed up with creative works, and the public's criticism of his work. 3 Shark Diver by Frank Eliscu (1912 - 1996) Bronze 1952. Frank Eliscu's experimental methods and materials allowed him to create figures that appear to be floating in space. Shark Diver with its inverted, entwined figures and many--tentacle sea plant is a good example of his unusual presentation. 4. Awakening by Anthony Antonios (b. 1942) Bronze, 1986. Gift of Slone Teague and Family. Anthony Antonios studied art at the Art Students Leahue, Pratt Institute and National Academy of Design where he now teaches. He has won many awards, including the Gold Medal of the American Artists Society. 5. Alligator Bender by Nathaniel Choate, b. 1899. Italian Marble. A man is seated on the back of an alligator, his legs gathered under him. With his left hand he grasps the jaw, and his right arm curves around the tail, bending the creature's body in a circle. His powerful muscles are contracted, and the radiating lines of the arms and legs are contrasted with the curving frame of the alligator. Originally carved in mahogany in New York in 1926. In enlarging it, the sculptor made it heavier and the man more robust. He carved it in marble in 1937. Located at the Reflecting Pool. 6. Into the Unknown. Hermon Atkins MacNeil. (1866 - 1947) White marble, 1912. S,1948.001. (Near Brown Sculpture Ctr.) 4. Fountain of the Muses by Carl Milles in Bronze. The four males on the side of the pool represent branches of the fine arts. In the words of the sculptor, "Each artist carries his symbol with him. The Poet - the blue bird; the Architect his new formed column; the Musician; his old interesting instrument; the Painter (here represented by Eugene Delicroix) his flowers."
Foxhounds
Man Carving his own Destiny
 Pegasus, Augustus Saint-Gaudens
Diana
1. American Foxhounds by Walter T. Matin (b. 1953) Bronze, 1997. By tradition, foxhounds are counted in couples, and they are hounds, not dogs. This pair of females hounds was modeled from the winners of an annual Virginia Foxhound Show. 2 Man Carving his own Destiny Albin Polasek 1879 - 1965 .The sculpture of Indiana Limestone was created when Polasek was a student at the PA Academy of Fine Arts. 3. Pegasus, Augustus Saint-Gaudens (1848-1907) 4 and 5. Diana. The bronze Diana in the collection of Brookgreen Gardens was made from a unique Portland cement cast of the second version which Saint-Gaudens had given in 1894 to his friend and frequent collaborator, Stanford White, the architect of Madison Square Garden. 6. Two Kids by Oronzio Maldarelli (c. 1892 - 1963) A pattern of diagonals makes this group appealing. The balance of form and ornamental treatment of details enhances the quality. Maldarelli's garden sculpture often featured stylized decoration.
The Plantation Owner
Young Diana by Anna Hyatt Huntington
Call of the Sea Harriet Frishmuth
Reaching - EvAngelos William Frudakis.
Sunflowers by Charles Cooper Parks
Nature's Dance by Alexander Stirling Calder
1. Call of the Sea. Bronze. By Harriet Frishmuth. Frishmuth made a name for herself through youth scuplture by producing a series of lithe female forms. Call of the Sea was posed by a dance student and is an example of Frishmuth's exuberant style. Brown Sculpture Court, located in the center of the Huntington Sculpture Garden, contains a permanent exhibition of smaller works and many white marble pieces. This display surrounds an elegant reflecting pool and a cascading water feature. 2. Reaching, EvAngelos William Frudakis. Bronze, 1996. Lovely waterfall hydrangea and pathway. 3. Sunflowers by Charles Cooper Parks (b. 1922) Bronze 1974. Charles Park created a series of children and young women placed in whimsical or improbable positions to depict the fantasy and charm of youth. Sunflowers was donated to Brookgreen in 1984 4. Nature's Dance by Alexander Stirling Calder (1870 - 1945) Limestone, 1938. In garden sculpture, Alexander Stirling Calder was able to show his innovative and decorative flair. Symbolic of Mother Nature, dancing in joyful abandon and standing on a ringed sphere, the figure is encircled by a curving rise of birds. 5. Young Diana by Anna Hyatt Huntington in Bronze - 1924 6. Diana of the Chase by Anna Hyatt Huntington Figure/female/mythology/animal/dog The goddess stands on a globe, gazing upward, the bow raised in the left hand, the right hand drawn back after releasing the string. Her hair is in short curls. A piece of drapery falls from her right arm around her body. A hound leaps upward between her feet.
Marabou by Shonnard
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1. Seaweed Fountain by Beatrice Fenton (1887 - 1983) Bronze, 1920. Although Fenton's most important works were lively fountains of realistic figures embellished with fanciful ornaments, she also won awards for animal and portrait sculpture. Seaweed Fountain received the Widner Gold Medal of the APA Academy of the Fine Arts in 1933. 2. Marabou by Eugenie Frederica Shonnard, (1886-1978) Napoleon Gray Marble, c.1915. After studies with Alphonse Muca and James Earle Fraser in New York, Shonnard went to Paris in 1911 and received criticism from Bourdelle and Rodin. The elongated lines of wading birds suited her as suvjects and she created many for private gardens. 3. Narcissus by Adolph Alexander Weinman (1870 - 1952) Tennessee Marble . Illustrating the myth of Naarcissus, the youth who fell in love with his own reflection. This award-winning work presents pleasing line and decorative modeling. Weinman's body of work extended from such charming garden figures to architectural sculpture, monuments and medallic art. 4. Sundial by Brenda Putnam (1850 - 1975) Bronze on Georgia pink marble pedestal, 1931. As a young sculptor, Putnam created a series of fountains and sundials that helped establish her career. Sundial continued a theme adapted from Renaissance sculpture, featuring merry children and animals. Putnam's cheerful cherubs never fail to please and amuse. 5. Griffin, by Paul Howard Manship (1885-1966) Limestone, 1917. This mythological creature and its companion, was part of a large sculpture that Manship created for Immergrun, the estate of steel industrialist Charles Schwab at Loretto, PA. In antiquity, the griffin, with the body of a lion and the wings and head of an eagle, was a powerful and majestic symbol of divine power.
Narcissus by Adolph Alexander Weinman
Sundial by Brenda Putnam
The Saint James Triad by Richard McDermott Miller
 Persephone by Marshall Maynard Fredricks
Evening
Gazalle Fountain
Cares for her brothers
1. Persephone by Marshall Maynard Fredricks (1908-1998) Bronze. Persephone, Greek Goddess of spring and queen of the underworld, was allowed to spend 6 months of the year in Hades with her husband, Pluto, and 6 months above ground with her mother, Demeter, goddess of the harvest. Fredricks depicted the moment of her ascension from the world of the dead to the realm of the living, just as a plant sprouts below ground and emerges through the soil. 2. Evening by Paul Howard Manship (1885 - 1966) Bronze, 1938 - Evening is the study model for one of our sculptures known as "The Moods of Time" that Paul Manship created for the 1939 New York World's Fair. Manship repeated the use of figures in a floating, horizontal design in many of his successful works. 3. Gazelle Fountain by Marshall Maynard Fredericks (1908-1998) Bronze. The sleek gazelle was adapted from the central figure of the Levi Barbour Memorial Fountain on Belle Isle in the Detroit River. In 1936 this design won first place in a national competition. In 1972 it won the purchase prize in a competition sponsored by Brookgreen Gardens. 4 Cares for her Brothers by Veryl Goodnight (born 1947) Bronze, 1985, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Wynant J. Williams. Colorado native Goodnight began her career as a painter but radially shifted to sculpture in 1972. Focusing on animals, she portrayed the domestic and wild creatures that were found on her ranch, "Cares for her Brothers" was the first of a series that explored the interrelationships of humans and animals. The pioneer woman gently holding a deer fawn depicts the Cheyenne story of Ewo-Wumishi-He-Me, the woman who cared for all living creatures. 5. Tickled by Louise Peterson Sculpter. On loan to Brookgreen. National Sculpture Society Brookgreen 2011 Annual Awards 6. Laughing Boy and Goat, Attilio Piccirilli (1866 - 1945) Lead 1946. The eldest of 6 brothers, Piccirilli headed the family stone carving studio.He was the sculptor of several important works, including the Maine Monument and figures on the facade of The Brooklyn Museum. This little sculpture was designed in 1936 on a creative impulse of the sculptor. 7. Pledge of Allegiance, by Glenna Goodacre who is best known for having designed the Sacagawea dollar that entered circulation in the United States in 2000. She also designed the Vietnam Women's Memorial located in Washington, D.C. NOTE: Pledge of Allegiance is currently on loan to the Myrtle Beach International Airport (MYR.) Photo here
Tickled
Disarmament
Boy and Frog
Circle of Life: Creation
1. Disarmament by Daniel Chester French (1850-1931) Bronz, 1919. Known as the sculptor of "Seated Lincoln" in the Lincoln Memorial and "The Minuteman" in Concord, Massachusetts, French produced some of America's best loved monuments. "Disarmament" was modeled for a temporary Victory Arch in NY City at the close of World War 1. The rugged warrior, with his massive sword and battle-worn appearance, smiles gently at an infant, who reaches up to him. 2. Boy and Frog, Elsie Ward Hering (1872-1923) Bronze. As an assistant in the studio of Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Elsie Hering helped finish much of the sculptures done toward the end of his life. After his death in 1907, she completed a commission that was praised as an "astonishingly beautiful and poetic result filled with the spirit of his life." This example of her own delightful sculpture was awarded a bronze medal at the St. Louis Exposition in 1904. 3. Creation: She is the east where dawn brines the new day. She is spring when the land bursts into bloom. She is water, the cradle of life.. From Circle of Life by Harold "Tuck" Langland (born 1939) Bronze, 2001. Gift of Tuck and Janice Langland. Using the metaphor of dance, this group of 4 figures (two shown above) represents the cycles of human life, four seasons, four elements, and four directions. Each figure has an accompanying poem written by the sculptor. 4. Bring: He is the south with the sun high in the day. He is summer with growth abundant. He is air and breath of life. From Circle of Life by Harold "Tuck" Langland (born 1939) Bronze, 2001. Gift of Tuck and Janice Langland. Using the metaphor of dance, this group of 4 figures represents the cycles of human life, four seasons, four elements, and four directions. 5. Transformation: He is the west where the sun descends blazing. He is autumn when living things look to their rest. He is transforming fire. From Circle of Life by Harold "Tuck" Langland (born 1939) Bronze, 2001. Gift of Tuck and Janice Langland. Using the metaphor of dance, this group of 4 figures (two shown above) represents the cycles of human life, four seasons, four elements, and four directions. Each figure has an accompanying poem written by the sculptor. 6. Dormancy: She is north that waits in darkness. She is winter when all is still. She is earth listening for spring rain. From Circle of Life by Harold "Tuck" Langland (born 1939) Bronze, 2001. Gift of Tuck and Janice Langland. Using the metaphor of dance, this group of 4 figures (two shown above) represents the cycles of human life, four seasons, four elements, and four directions. Each figure has an accompanying poem written by the sculptor 7. Jaguar by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876 - 1973) Bronze, 1907. Among Huntington's early sculpture success was a series of jaguar studies done at the New York Zoological Society. The model, "Senor Lopez" was a beautiful creature, legendary for his size and ferocity. Huntington worked from memory of a split second scene when the animal began to move from an upper level down to his food bowl.
Nebula
Circle of Life : Being
Dancing Goat
Brown Bears
1. Nebula by Avard Tennyson Fairbanks (1897 - 1987) Bronze, 1934. Gift of Dr. Grant Fairbanks 2. Dancing Goat by Albert Laessle (1877-1954), Bronze, 1928. A goat on its hind legs is standing in a clump of rushes containing a snail, turtle and other marsh creatures, The hair rises in a ridge and a collar encircles its neck. 3. Brown Bears by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876 - 1973), Bronze, 1035. Gift of sculptor. A group of 3 bears are playing, One stands on hind legs, sparring with another, A third, leaning against the log is licking a hind foot. Huntington's sculpture which started when she was 13, continued until her death at 97. In 1985 she was in ducted into the SC Hall of Fame. 4. Heron, Grouse and Loon, by Elliot Offner (b. 1031) Bronze, 1992, Gift of family - Austin P. Kelley. Offner is known for his sculpture's meticulous surface treatments and compositions, The first casting of Heron, Grouse and Loon was created in 1992 for a downtown location in Minneapolis. 5. In Memory of the Work Horse, by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876-1973) Bronze, 1964. During her youth, Anna often observed and worked with large draft horses 86ed for plowing and hauling hay at the family farm in Annisquam, Massachusetts. The memory served as inspiration for several sculptures throughout her career. 6. The Plantation Owner. Plantations were designed to produce crops on a large scale for exportation. In coastal South Carolina, the plantation owners were known as Planters. Babette Bloch experiemented with various sculpture media, and discovered laser-cut technology. Fourt stainless steel figures were commissioned in 2004 and placed in 2006.
Pledge of Allegiance
Jaguar
Heron, Grouse and Loon
In Memory of the Work Horse
Presidential Eagle,
awakening
Diving Eagle
Wildlife Column
1. Awakening by Vincent Glinsky (1895-1975) Tennessee marble, 1946. Vincent Glinsky was a proponent of direct-carving, where the sculptor carved directly into stone, using no preliminary model. This sculpture depicts a woman rousing from deep slumber, her body heavy and languid with sleep. Glinsky emphasized this work by leaving the marble block uncarved beneath the figure. 2. Diving Eagle by Albino Manca (1876-1973) Bronze, 1963. Diving Eagle is the half-size model of the United States monument to those who died in the Atlantic Ocean during World War II. The large monument is located in New York City's Battery Parrk, near the former site of the World Trade Center. The eagle symbolically places a wreath upon the creast of a wave. Since its completion, this sculpture has won many awards. 3. Wildlife Column by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876-1973) Bronze, 1963. An expert animal sculptor, Anna embellished this work with wildlife native to the Southeast. Anchoring each corner are a fox, beaver, goose and duck. A spiral of heron-like birds rise from the top center. 4. Presidential Eagle, Sandy Scott, (b. 1943) Bronze, 2004. On loan from the sculptor. The eagle is a favorite subject for Sandy Scott. In 2004 this sculpture was enlarged from a small composition. This is the first casting of Presidential Eagle. 5. Lions by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876-1973) Bronze, 1930. The two handsome lions were first placed in 1930 at the entrance to the Hispanic Society of America in New York City, a museum founded by Archer Huntington. The bronze versions in NY were replaced by duplicates carved in limestone and the bronze versions were brought to Brookgreen Gardens in 1032. Each lion protects its own part of the world as revealed on the globes between the lions' paws. 6. Child of Peace by Edward Fenno Hoffman III (1916-1991) Bronze, 1962. Gift of the family of Anne Morrison Chapman. A love of children and small creatures inspired Hoffman's depiction of a young boy nestling a dove against his chest. The tender portrayal of childhood presents Hoffman's philosophy: "I want to animate my sculpture with an inner life that people sense when observing it." This sculpture received the Dr. Maurice B. Hexter prize.
Lions by Anna Hyatt Huntington
Child of Peace
Circle of Life - Dormancy
Circle of Life - Transformation
 Ecstasy Gleb Derujinsky
Deerhounds Playing
The Sixth Day by Chester Martin
Nereid by Berthold Nebel
Inspiration
1. Ecstasy by Gleb Derujinsky (1888-1975) The sculptor composed this group with the emphasis on space surrounded by figures. The wave-like movement creates a work of dynamic energy. Ecstasy was designed for Brookgreen Gardens. 2. Deerhounds Playing by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876 - 1973) Bronze, 1949. Two Scottish deerhounds face one another in a mock battle This lively composition is enhanced by the attitude of playfulness. 3. The Sixth Day by Chester Martin (b. 1934) Bronze, 1980. Noted as a painterm Chester Martin worked for the US Mint as an engraver. He experimented in relief sculpture. In 1980 he entered the Society of Medalists' National competition to design the 50th anniversary commemorative medal. The Sixth Day won 1at Place. It was enlarged and presented to Brookgreen in 1981. 4. Nereid by Berthold Nebel (1889-1964) Gris de Alicia marble, 1945. As a young man, Berthold Nebel designed terra cotta ornaments for a NJ firm. He later studied with James Earle Fraser at the Art Students League . In 1914 he won the Prix de Rome Fellowship ar the American Academy. 5. Inspiration by Edward Field Sanford, Jr. (1886-1951) Bronze, 1928.
Wild Boars, Anna Hyatt Huntington
Isabel by Betty Branch
Black Panthers by Wheeler Williams
1. Wild Boars by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876 - 1973) Aluminum, 1935 2. Isabel by Betty Branch (b. 1945) Bronze, 1983. Beginning as a painter, Betty Branch did not take up sculpture until the 1970s. Since then, she has traveled a circuitous road of self-study. Her work is comprised of variety of media including stone, metal, cloth, fiber and natural materials. 3. Black Panthers by Wheeler Williams (1897-1972) Oxidized silver-plated bronze, 1933. Although known for featuring human figures, Wheeler Williams was also interested in animal subjects. This panther and its companion, were modeled in his studio in Hollywood, CA. The pair was awarded the Ellin P. Speyer Prize at the National Academy of Design in 1940. 4. Rain, by Avard Tennyson Fairbanks 1897-1987. Bronz, 1933 5. The Whip by George Frederick Holschuh (1902 - 1999) Bronze 6. Pas de Trois by John Cavanaugh (1921-1985) Bronze. John Cavanaugh was a pioneer for hammering and forming sculpture designs from sheets of lead. Pas dde Trois, depicting three ballerinas with hands joined above their heads was done in 1983. President Bull Clinton presented a small version of this sculpture to President Jacques Chirac of France in 1995
Rain, by Avard Tennyson Fairbanks
The Whip by by George Frederick Holschuh
Pas de Trois by John Cavanaugh
First Fish by Carter Jones
 The Eagle's Egg by Ralph Hamilton Humes
Wolf and Wolfhound by Zenos Frudakis
Alligator by David Hunter Turner
A Fool for Love by Walter T. Matia
1. First Fish by Carter R. Jones (b. 1943) Bronze, 2007. Carter Jones studied at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and then studied in Paris. After spending time at Brookrgeen, he designed the 2004 Brookgreen Medal, which featured the River Otters. The whimsical group of a mother with two kits was modeled to appeal especially to children. 2. The Eagle's Egg by Ralph Hamilton Humes (1902-1981) Aluminum, 1953. Humes took up sculpture as a physical therapy after the loss of several fingers and an eye in a bomb explosion while serving in the army. Recognizing his artistic ability, the government paid for one term of study at the Rinehart School of Sculpture in Baltimore. 3. Wolf and Wolfhound by Zenos Frudakis (b. 1951) Frudakis is a sculptor of the human figure. e has modeled portraits of prominent persons such as Bishop Desmond Tutu and Dr. Martin Luther King. Wolf and Wolfhound, commissioned in 1985 for an estate in Vineland, NJ, is comprised of two separate sculptures. The hound was awarded a Silver Medal at the National Sculpture Society exhibition in 1986. 4. Alligator by David Hunter Turner (b. 1961) Gift of the sculptor. The son of wildlife sculptor William H. Turner, David grew up with sculpture. He studied with his father and became an avid naturalist, earning a degree in biology from the College of William and Mary. 5. A Fool for Love by Walter T. Matia (born 1953.) Bronze 2004. Gift of the sculptor. Walter Matia knows the symbiotic relationships among works of art, conservation of the environment, public support of museums, and species preservation. Winner of the National Sculpture Society Bronze Medal in the 72nd Annual Awards Exhibition, A Fool for Love depicts a male wild turkey trying to attract a female. 6. Maidenhood located in Brown Sculpture Center. By George Barnard, using chorus girl, Evelyn Nesbit as the model.
Brown Sculpture Center - Marble
Diana by Paul Howard Manship
Lioness and Cub by Hope Yandell
Triton on Dolphin
Shell Boy by Avard Tennyson Fairbanks
1. Actaeon by Paul Howard Manship (1885 - 1966) Gilt Bronze, begun in 1915, enlarge and completed in 1924. At the American Academy in Rome, Manshoip derived his inspiration from ancient art. The use of repetitive patterns in hair, fur, and enameled eyes helped place his work in the forefront of American sculpture. Actaeon and his companion Diana (both sculptures are located at the dar end of the walk near the Old Rice Plantation) depict the myth of the unfortunate hunter who surprised Diana as she bathes in a woodland pool. Enraged, Dana turned him into a stag, and he was killed by his own hounds. Diana by Paul Howard Manship (1885 - 1966) Gilt Bronze, begun in 1915, enlarge and completed in 1924. 2. Diana (companion statue to Actaeon) Actaeon depicts the myth of the unfortunate hunter who surprised Diana in a woodland pool. Enraged, Diana turned him into a stag, and he was killed by his own hounds. 3. Triton on Dolphin by Benjamin Franklin Hawkins (1896 - 1898) Limestone, c. 1933 After studying at the St. Louis School of Fine Arts and the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design, Hawkins made architectural sculpture his specialty. The sharp defined planes of this group indicate his chosen field. Triton on Dolphin was awarded the Avery Prize of the Architectural League in 1933. The sculpture was carved by master carver Roger Morigi. 4. Lioness and Cub by Hope Yandell (b. 1947) Bronze, 1981. Gift of sculptor in honor of Margaret Mason Peabody. Hope Yandell came to sculpture through a route of self-study and experimentation. The great-niece of sculptor Enid Yandell, she grew up in a family that encouraged artistic expression.in 1980 she enrolled at the National Academy of Design School. The stone base is an integral part of Lioness and Cub, Yandell's first major commission. 5. Shell Boy by Avard Tennyson Fairbanks (1897- 1987) Bronze, 1933 Gift of Grant. R, Fairbanks, M.D. Avard Tennyson Fairbanks showed early artistic talent and won a scholarship at age 13 to study at the Art Students League with James Earle Fraser. In addition to creating a number of monuments, portraits and animal studies, Fairbanks taught sculpture and organized art departments in universities throughout the United States. This work was created when he was a sculptor in Residence at the University of Michigan.
The Wounded Comrade
Faun by Leo Lentelli
Forest Idyl by Albin Polasek
Forest Idyl close up face
Seal by Furio Piccirilli
The Diver by Stephen H. Smith
1. The Wounded Comrade by Carl Ethan Akeley (1864 - 1926) Bronze, 1913. A gift of Robert V. Hatcher, Jr. 2. Faun by Leo Lentelli (1879 - 1961) Bronze, 1931. Coming to the United States from Rome as an experienced sculptor in 1903, Lentelli worked in the studios of Philip Martiny, Stirling Calder, and other American sculptors in New York. His impressionistic style, long limbed figures and ornamental flair was especially suited to architectural works and fountain figures. Faun was created for the Boca Raton Club in FL, and three examples were cast. This one was acquired byt Brookgreen in 1932. 3. and 4. Forest Idyl by Albin Polasek (1879 - 1965) Bronze 1903.A period of study at the American Academy in Rome helped develop Polasek's sense of style and affinity for the human figure. After his return to America in 1913, he took a job as head of the sculpture department at the Art Institute in Chicago. In 1930 he returned to the American Academy as a visiting professor where this sculpture was modeled. 5. Seal by Furio Piccirilli (1868 - 1949) Black Marble. One of six brothers who worked in the old world tradition in the family stone carving business, Furio Piccirilli specialized in figure sculpture and was considered the most creative of them all. Seal was awarded the Speyer Prize at the National Academy of Design exhibition in 1929. 6. The Diver by Stephen H. Smith (born 1958) Bronze on granite base, 2007. Stephen Smith earned a MFA in Sculpture from the University of North Carolina. Compositionally, this sculpture illustrates the harmony and grace of the diver as he is about to leave the platform. It was shown in the National Sculpture Society's 75th Annual Awards Exhibition where it won the Brookgreen People's Choice Award and was later donated to the collection.

Peace Fountain by Sandy Scott
Joy, by Karl Heinrich Gruppe
Fall of France by George Demetrios
Diana by Gleb W. Derujunsky
Kaethe, Age Nine, by Sigmund Abeles
The Source by Janice Mauro
 St. Christopher by Eleanor Mary Mellon
Tragedy and Comedy by Alexander Stirling Calder
American St. Francis by Charles Cropper Parks
Builders of the Future by William Zorach
Brown Sculpture Court
1. Tragedy and Comedy by Alexander Stirling Calder (1870 - 1945) Bronze, c. 1928. One of the first American sculptors to place emphasis on the decorate qualities of his art. His method progressed from the realism of the 19th century toward an increased stylization of forms. The two figures of Hamlet and Touchstone epitomize 'Tragedy and Comedy' in Calder's presentation of humor and drama with decorative detail. The heroic bronze of this work is a memorial to William Shakespeare. Brown Sculpture Court. 2. Joy, by Karl Heinrich Gruppe (1893 - 1982) Tennessee Marble, 1925 The son of an American artist who painted scenes of Holland, Karl Gruppe spent his youth near The Hague. After the family;s return to New York City, he worked in the studio of Herbert Adams and studied at the Art Students' League. He later became an assistant to Karl Bitter and Charles Cary Rumsey. An early version of Joy was awarded the Barnett Prize of the National Academy of Design in 1926. 3. Fall of France by George Demetrios (1896 - 1974) Gift of heirs of George Demetrios. George Demetrios came to Boston from Greece in 1912. His talent for drawing brought financial sponsorship, allowing him to attend the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, then to apprentice in the studio of Charles Grafly. His belief of direct drawing as a basis for sculpture resulted in work of pure line with little detail. Demetrios was profoundly moved by events of World War II. This sculpture expressively depicted his mood of despair. 4. Kaethe, Age Nine, by Sigmund Abeles (b. 1934) Btonze 1968. As a draftsman, etcher. lithographer, pastellist and sculptor, Sigmund Abeles has achieved international acclaim as one of the country's leading realistic artists of the post-war era. Having spent his childhood in Myrtle Beach, Ables' visited Brookgreen often and credits the gardens as "the spark that set him afire for realism." Sigmund Abeles' ability to capture an intense solitary human portrait is evident in this pensive sculpture of a young girl. Near Offner Bldg. 5. Builders of the Future by William Zorach (1887 - 1966) Bronze, 1938. Gift of William N. Bloom Brown Sculpture Court. 6. Peace Fountain by Sandy Scott (b. 1943) Bronze, 1996. Gift of family and friends of Linda S. Burnett. This presentation of birds in flight and its many possibilities has always intrigued Sandy Scott as a sculpture theme. Scott believes her knowledge of aerodynamics, a result of more than 25 years as a licensed pilot, has been helpful in achieving the illusion of movement in her award-winning sculpture of birds.
1. The Source by Janice Mauro (b. 1953) Bronze, 2011. Janice Mauro's sculpture often presents the female form as a center of spiritual energy. Seen as classical images, jeer figures are metaphors for beauty, wisdom or power. The the,e if water in ancient religion and myth is depicted in this serene sculpture reminiscent of figures on medieval cathedrals. Though depicted as quiet and reverent, this sculpture also generates physical and emotional power. 2. St. Christopher by Eleanor Mary Mellon (1894 - 1979) Bronze, 1967. Gift of the sculptor. Eleanor Maty Mellon, studied with A. A. Weinman, Harriet Frishmuth, Robert Aitken, and Charles Grafly. The sculptor of garden figures, she was known for religious themes. St. Christopher is subtitled, "Behold St. Christopher, then shalt thou be safe."Diana by Gleb W. Derujunsky (1888 - 1975) Bronze, c. 1925. One of Derujunsky's popular small bronzes, Diana creates a delightful pattern with a sweeping rush of bodies. An accomplished pianist, Derujunsky may have been influenced by his talent in woodcarving also enabled him to create pleasing yet workable compositions. 4. American St. Francis by Charles Cropper Parks (1922 - 2012) Bronze 1969. The idea of a predator and prey coexisting in harmony, represented here by hounds and raccoon, is a recurring theme in the works of Charles Cropper Parks. Originally titled 'Boy and Dogs' this work was created for Fountain Plaza, Wolmington, Delaware. The lifetime works of Charles Cropper Parks are a Delaware treasure. 5. Brown Sculpture Court - Featuring many Marble sculptures
Brown Sculpture Court
1. Brown Sculpture Court 2. Boy and Panther, by Rudulph Evans 1878 - 1960) Bronze, 1819. This sculpture is an interpretation of Rudyard Kipling's Mowgli from 'The Jungle Book'. Evans was a versatile sculptor of architectural sculpture and public monuments such as the statue of Thomas Jefferson in the Jefferson Memorial Washington, DC 3. The Bat - by Lawrence Tenney Stevens (1896 - 1972) Steven began modeling figures while he was still in junior high school in Massachusetts. He was accepted at the Boston Museum School and went on to win the Prix de Roma in 1922, to study for three years at the American Academy in Rome. 4. Timber Wolf Family by William Henry Turner (born 1035) Bronze 1990, gift of Dorothy R, Blair. A self-taught artist, Turner experiments with modeling and casting techniques, and has built his own foundry. At a young age, he became interested in taxidermy and sculpture after Robert H. Rockwell, noted animal sculptor and curator of the American Museum of Natural History, retired near Turner's home and eventually became his mentor. In 1989, Turner was commissioned by the museum to create this work as a memorial to Rockwell.
5. Baboon by Marshall Maynard Fredericks (1908 - 1998) Bronze, 1939. A male baboon sits in crouching position, his hands on each knee and teeth bared.
139th Psalm
Map of Brookgreen Gardens
Boy and Panther
The Bat - by Lawrence Tenney Stevens
Timber Wolf Family by William Henry Turner
 Baboon by Marshall Maynard Fredericks
Chico by E. Bruce Moore
Eat more Beef by Sandy Scott
The End of the Trail by James Earle
The Listeners by Hazel Brill Jackson
The Torchbearer by Anna Hyatt Huntington
Children with Gazelle
1. Chico by E. Bruce Moore (1905 - 1980) Bruce Moore attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts from 1022 to 1926, studying with both Albert Laessle and Charles Grafly. In this sculpture, a monkey crouches on it forelegs, and watches a grasshopper. The sculpture was created in 1927. 2. Eat more Beef by Sandy Scott (born 1943) Bronze. Gift of Trish Smith. A graduate of the Kansas City Art Institute, Sandy Scott started her art career in the 1970's as an award-winning printmaker. Today she is one of the country's leading animal sculptors. 3. The End of the Trail by James Earle (1870 - 1953) Bronze 1950. S.1932.001 4. The Listeners by Hazel Brill Jackson (1894 - 1991) Bronze, 1962. Although Hazel Jackson was born in Philadelphia, her family went to Italy to live when she was a child. She returned to America at the outbreak of World War I, but after the war, went back to Italy and worked in Rome until 1935. The Listeners resulted from observing a raccoon family living in her icehouse for several years in Newburgh, New York. 5. The Torchbearer, 1953, by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876 - 1973) Bronze, 2959, S.1994.003. permanent loan from the Hispanic Society of America
1. Children with Gazelle by Anthony de Francisci (1887 - 1067) Soon after emigration to America on 1902, de Francicsci continued his studies at the National Academy of Design, Cooper Union and the Art Students' League. This sculptures was modeled at New York and carved in 1937. The contrast between the animal's tense muscles and the children's chubby forms create an interesting design. 2. Seated Fawn by Janet Scudder (1873 - 1940) Bronze, 1942. Scudder was among the first group of American artists to specialize in figures for garden settings. According to the artist, her aim was to please and amuse the world with her sculpture. The gaiety of her figures was tempered by her sense of style, featuring sleek surfaces and emphasis on line. 3. Nymph by Paul Fjelde (1892 - 1984) Bronze, 1932. Fjelde's early skill in creating busts and portrait reliefs enabled him to become an assistant to Lorado Taft in Chicago. He continued studies in Copehagen and Paris. Fjelde's flair for finely modeled ornament is evident in this lovely figure 4. Sea Horse by Joseph Kiselewski (1901 - 1988) Bronze 1937. A versatile sculptor, Kiselewski had extensive training. Four years as an assistant to Lee Lawrie allowed him to develop a standard of perfection evident in his designs and detail. Sea Horse was one of four castings commissioned for the fountain pools in Radio Corp. of America display in the 1939 New York World Fair. 5. Sea Urchin by Edward Berge (1876 - 1924) and Henry Berge (1908 - 1998) Bronze 1921. Gift of the family of Anne Morrison Chapman. While on visit to the shore, Edward Berge watched young children excitedly hold up their treasures for all to see. Inspired, he used his niece Sarah as a model to recreate this moment in time. The first culpture was 3.5 feet tall and was replaced by a second version, enlarged to t feet, by Edward Berge's son, Henry.
Seated Fawn by Janet Scudder
Nymph by Paul Fjelde
Actaeon by Paul Howard Manship
Sea Horse by Joseph Kiselewski
Sea Urchin by Edward Berge
Girl With Fish by Harriet Hyatt Mayor (
Samson and the Lion by Gleb Derujunsky
Anhingas by Gustave Bohland
 Primitive Man and Serpent by Roland Hinton Perry
1. Girl With Fish by Harriet Hyatt Mayor (1868 - 1960) Bronze. Remembering stories from Rudyard Kipling's 'The Jungle Book' Harriott Mayor was inspired to create this female version of the impish prankster, Mowgli. The sister of Ann Hyatt Huntington, Mayor was the first sculptor in the family. 2. Samson and the Lion by Gleb Derujunsky (1888 - 1975) Limestone 1949. Derujunsky 's work included a large number of biblical themes such as this powerful rendition of Samson and the Lion. As proficient at carving as he was at modeling in clay, Derujinsky worked in both stone and wood 3. Group of Anhingas by Gustave Bohland (1895 - 1959) Aluminum, 1936 A female anhinga, or water turkey, on the nest shelters her fledglings beneath her wings. This group ornamented the facade of Bohland's studio at Miami Beach, Florida. A native of Austria, he was best known for portraits and bas-reliefs. 4. Primitive Man and Serpent by Roland Hinton Perry (1870 - 1941) Bronze, 1899. Originally titled Thor and the Midgard Serpent, this work portrayed the final battle of Ragnorok - the twilight of the gods and the end of the world in Norse mythology. The thunder god Thor killed the serpent Jormangund, but then died for exposure to its deadly venom, the myth representing the end of paganism and the beginning of the Christian era in northern Europe. 5. Scratching Doe by Dan Ostermiller (b.1956) Bronze, 1996. Gift of Nedra and Richard Matteucci. A fascination with wildlife led Dan Ostermilea at an early age to become a sculptor. Although his work is realistic, it is not just an accurate rendering of the subject, but an artistic combination of line and composition. A self-taught artist, Ostermiller draws upon his vast knowledge fog animal anatomy acquired through years of keen observation.
Scratching Doe by Dan Ostermiller (
Youth Taming The Wild - Anna Huntington
1. Youth Taming the Wild by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876 - 1973) Limestone. The founders of Brookgreen Gardens, Anna and Arthur Huntington, created a haven for native plants, animals and American Sculpture. One of the first pieces to be placed here, Youth's theme was adapted as a memorial to Archer's father, Collis P. Huntington, one of the "big four" who built the transcontinental railroad. The idea of a burgeoning America, represented by a vital young man, taming the rearing horse of the Wild West, had great appeal at the time. 2. St. Francis by Julian Hoke Harris (1906 - 1987) Bronze, 1962. A native of Georgia, Harris was a relative of the author Joel Chandler Harris. He studied architecture and had a teaching career at the Georgia Institute of Technology that paralleled his career as a sculptor. Harris's skill in portraiture and bas-relief led to important commissions such as the inaugural medal for President Jimmy Carter. 3. St. Francis byBruce Moore (1905 - 1980) Bronze. S.1947.00S. 4. The Youthful Franklin by Robert Tait McKinzie (1867 - 1938) Bronze 1914. This sculpture was done for the campus of the University of Pennsylvania. The illustrator. Howard Pyle, made a number of sketches showing the costume of a boy from the Colonial period to assist McKenzie in his job. The sculptor used the Houdon bust of Franklin as a model for the face. Trained in medicine, McKenzie was a professor of physical education whose interest in the development of body led to sculpture. 5. Loie Fuller: Vortez, by Barbara Lekberg (born 1925) Bronze 2005, Acquired by the Sculpture Purchase Fund. Known for metal welded figures, Barbara Lekberg learned to weld with Sahl Swarz at the Sculpture Center in New York during the late 1940s. Loie Fuller: Vortez, is inspired by an earlier welded figure, presents the fluid movement of a dancer spinning while her skirt swirls around her body. 6. Coming of Age by Paul Moore (born 1957.) Bronze, 1995. Gift of the sculptor. S2007.009
 St. Francis by Julian Hoke Harris
St. Francis by Julian Hoke Harris
The Youthful Franklin by Robert Tait McKinzie
Vortez by Barbara Lekberg
Coming of Age by Paul Moore
Vultures by Annan Hyatt Huntington
Between Yesterday and Tomorrow by Edith Howland
1. Vultures by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876 - 1973) Aluminum, 1933 S. 1939.003 2. Between Yesterday and Tomorrow by Edith Howland (1863 - 1949) white marble, 1913. S.1940.001, gift of the sculptor 3. Girl by a Pond. By Frances Grimes (1869 - 1963) White Marble, c. 1913. S.1836.034 4. Archer - Tejas Warrior by Allie Victoria Tennant (1898 - 1971) Bronze, 1936. S.1936 5. View of Brown Sculpture Court inside
Girl by a Pond. By Frances Grimes
Archer - Tejas Warrior by Allie Victoria Tennant
Brown Sculpture Court
1. Can Can by Jane DeDecker (born 1961.) The Jane DeDecker's dancers represent a cancer victim with 4 friends helping her through the process of dying. An allegory of the human spirit's triumph over death. This clay sculpture received the 1999 National Sculpture Society's Silver Medal. 2. and 3. Brown Sculpture Court. 4. Bella and the Bug by Louise Peterson (b. 1963) Bronze. Gift of sculptor. Originally trained in classical ballet, Louise Peterson did not begin to study sculpture until 1987. Bella and the Bug was inspired by observing her pet display a level of disturbed concentration for many minutes while inspecting a fly. 5. Spout for a Drinking Fountain by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876 - 1973) Aluminum, 1953. Anna Hyatt Huntington was the first sculptor in America to cast in aluminum which she liked for its light weight and luster. This duck sculpture was designed to accompany the oak-leaf carved marble base which was repurposed as a drinking fountain in 1952.
Marble statues in the Brown Sculpture Center
Bella and the Bug by Louise Peterson
Spout for a Drinking Fountain (Duck)
Indian and Eagle by Carl Paul Jennewein
Christ Child by Abram Belskie
Sylvan by Chester Beach
Torse de Femme by David Klass
1. Indian and Eagle by Carl Paul Jennewein 1890 - 1978. Bronze. 1929. Among Jennewein's early commissions was this one for a World War 1 American monument located in Tours, France. The sculptor envisioned an eagle being released by a Native American as a symbol of freedom and the American love of liberty. Modeled in 1929, this small study for a final version received the Widener Memorial Gold Medal at Philadelphia. 2. Christ Child by Abram Belskie (1907 - 1988) Serravizza marble, 1934. S.1934.024 3. Sylvan by Chester Beach (1881 - 1956) White Marble S.1932.001 4. Torse de Femme by David Klass (b. 1941) Indiana limestone, c. 1989. Gift of the sculptor. David Klass studied art and architecture at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. For two years he studied anatomy at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons as an adjunct to his own sculpture development. His work is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art and many other collections. 5. Sonata by Mario Joseph Korbel (1882 - 1954) White Marble. S.1932.031 6. Siberian Ram by Marshall Maynard Fredericks (1908-1998) The animal sculpture of Marshall Fredericks is both energetic and whimsical, as seen in this depiction of a ram. Carved in limestone in 1063 for the grounds of the Baldwin Public Library in Birmingham, Michigan, Siberian Ram lost none of its power when cast in bronze.
Sonata by Mario Joseph Korbel
Peacocks by Dan Ostermiller
1. Peacocks by Dan Ostermiller (b. 1956) Bronze, 2004. On loan from the Private Collection of Tia. A fascination with wildlife led Dan Ostermiller at an early age to become a sculptor. Although his work is realistic, it's not just an accurate rendering, but a skillful blend of lines, composition and texture. As a self-taught artist, Ostermiller draws upon his knowledge of animal anatomy acquired through years of observation. His works are in public an private collections worldwide. 2. A penchant for astrological and mythological symbolism comes across clearly in Paul Howard Manship's work. The sundial symbolizes the cycle of life encompassed by the cycle of eternity. It is patterned after an ancient astronomical devise composed of rings, representing the great circles of the heavens. In the rings and base are depicted the elements, seasons, hours of day and signs of the Zodiac. 3. Polar Bears by Frederick George Richard Roth (1872-1944) Frederick Roth preferred to present animals in natural settings using an impressionistic modeling style. His work often depicted his subtle sense of humor and preference for movement, Polar Bears assured his election to the National Academy of Design in 1906 and won the National Arts Club Prize in 1924. 4. and 5. Neptune (4) and Amphitrite (5) by Wheeler Williams (1897 - 1972) Lead, 1939. Representing the youthful god of the sea, Neptune, and his wife Amphitrite, these two figures are part of a series entitled "The Childhood of the Gods." Neptune stands with a trident in hand while Amphitrite, who has the body of a mermaid, holds a seashell to her ear.
Cycle of Life
Brookgreen map
Polar Bears by Frederick George Richard Roth
Neptune by Wheeler Williams
Amphitrite by Wheeler Williams
Laughing Boy and Goat
Two Kids by Oronzio Maldarelli
Fillies Playing by Anna Hyatt Huntington
A Female Centaur by Anna Hyatt Huntington
The Centaur Cheiron
1. Fillies Playing by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876 - 1973) Bronze, 1956. This example cast in 2010. Anna Hyatt Huntington created two sizes of Fillies Playing in her studio at Stanerigg Farm near Redding, CT. The small version (1955) is thought to have never been cast; the large version (1956) apparently was cast only once. The aluminum casting, made by Roman Bronze Works in New York City. was shown at the National Academy of Design and awarded the Elizabeth N. Waltrous Gold Medal in 1958 and was donated to the University of SC in 1960. This is a cast of the large version made in 2010 by Roman Bronze Studio with new molds from the original plaster model. 2. A Female Centaur by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876-1973) Brass, 1936. Designed as a companion to Cheiron and exhibited at the 1939 New York World's Fair, this creature was given female attributes within a male form. The fierce stance and primitive features add a menacing quality to the depiction 3. The Centaur Cheiron by Anna Hyatt Huntington Cheiron, a wise centaur in Greek mythology, was an expert in medicine due to his knowledge of herbs. For his skill in the healing arts, he was rewarded with immortality. But after a painful wound in battle, he chose death over an eternity of suffering. Zeus placed him in the heavens where he became the constellation known as The Archer, Sagittarius. 4. The Hungry Loop by Herb Mignery (b. 1937) Rather than follow his family's 110 year tradition of Nebrasa ranching, Mignery had a career in commercial art before turning to fine art. This sculpture depicts an African-American on horseback, parrot of the history of cowboys in the West. The title is a term used to describe a rodeo roper who desperately need to win his event. Mignery wrote "…the subjecty is obviously well worn from his efforts. However, I have portrayed his demeanor and posture to indicate that he will eventually succeed." 5. and 6. Boy and Girl Dolphins by Milton Horn (1906-1995) Limestone 1929. Milton Horn came to the United States from Russia in 1913. He ettled in Taunton, MA and studied art with Hudson Kitson in Boston, and later at Beux-Art Institute of Design in New York. From 1939 to 1949, he collaborated with Frank Lloyd Wright. After Chicago became the center for his work, Horn began to focus on the field of architectural sculpture.
Boy and Snails by Joseph Emile Renier (
Gentle Tapir. Dorothea Schwarez Greenbaum
Dancing Goat by Albert Laessle
Doe by Marion Branning
Warm Currents - Steve Kestrel
Great Blue Heron by Catherine K. Ferrell
1. Boy and Snails by Joseph Emile Renier (1887-1966) Bronze. A multi-talented artist, Joseph Renier was equally skilled in creating monumental, architectural and relief sculpture, His award winning garden figures reflect both gaiety and originality of design. The sketch for this figure earned a Garden Club of AmericaAmerica prize in 1928 2. Gentle Tapir. Dorothea Schwarez Greenbaum (1893 - 1986) In 1927, after several decades of formal study in painting, Dorothea Schwarez Greenbaum began to model animals in sculpture. Her versatility in media-terra cotta, bronze, and hammered lead - resulted in Greenbaum's popularity among museums. This pice was modeled in 1943 from a Central American tapir in the Washington Zoo. The friendly, place temperament of the animal is evident. 3. Dancing Goat by Albert Laessle (1877 - 1954) Bronze 1928. A goat prances om its hind legs, forefeet waving in the air and neck arched. It is standing on a clump of rushes containing a snail, turtle and other marsh crushes. The goat's hair rises in a ridge with a braid at each side. A collar encircles its neck and its horns are tipped with knobs. 4. Doe by Marion Branning (dates unknown) Bronze. Designed in broad planes, this gentle sculpture evokes visions of a quiet woodland scene. The artist, who graduated from the Rinehart School of Sculpture at Baltimore in 1929, also taught techniques of jewelry and metal work at the the Maryland Institute. 5. Warm Currents - Steve Kestrel (b. 1951) River Stone, 2000. Acquired with funds from the Sculpture Acquisition Fund. Sea turtles are air-breathijng reptiles remarkably adapt to liege in the sea. A streamlined shape, large and powerful fore flippers enable them to dive to great depths and travel long distances. Although at home in the ocean, sea turtles are tied to the land because females must leave the water to lay their eggs on a sandy beach. 6. Great Blue Heron by Catherine K. Ferrell (b. 1947) Bronze, 1999. Acquired with funds from the Sculpture Fund and friends of the sculptor. The largest of the herons on this continent, the Great Blue Heron typically lives near ponds, marshes, streams and tidal flats. Herons nest in communities with their own and other bird species.
Fountain of the Muses by Carl Milles i
My Niece, by Jo Davidson 1
April, by Charles Cropper Park
The Space Walker by Richard McDermott Miller
Duck and Turtle by Albert Laessle
Otter Rock by W.Barton "Bart" Walter
1. My Niece, by Jo Davidson 1883-1952. Jo Davidson distinguished himself as a portraitist, working rapidly so that he could express his thoughts as they came. His ability to present innate qualities with startling clarity was couples with a flair for capturing the physical appearance of the sitter. 2. April, by Charles Cropper Parks (1922 - 2012) Bronze 1998. Gift of sculptor. Modeled in the late 80s, this figure was based on the design of an earlier small sculpture of the Roman Goddess of Flowers, Flora. This work was an experiment, cast in a commercial foundry from several small rubber molds. Each part was then welded together to create a seamless casting in bronze. The lifetime works of Charles Cropper Parks is a Delaware treasure. 3. The Space Walker by Richard McDermott Miller (1922 - 2004) Bronze 1978. Gift of the sculptor. Often referred to as the "Figure Sculpture of Soho," Miller focused his work on the human figure, and, in particular, the female form. His bold figures always featured interesting composition and dynamic movement. Another casting of this size is located on the campus of Kent State University. 4. Duck and Turtle by Albert Laessle (1877 - 1954) Philadelphia native Albert Laessle's choice of animals as subjects began in his student days. He studied with Thomas Anshutz and Charles Grafly at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Europe. An art critic wrote that he presented his studies with something of the flavor of a humorous naturalist who observes the tragedies and comedies enacted in his little kingdom. 5. Otter Rock by W.Barton "Bart" Walter (b. 1958) Bronze 1992. Bart Walter's animal subjects are drawn from many regions of the world. His composition and modeling style, building layered surfaces of clay to depict muscle and movement, provide a fresh approach to his subjects. Bart Walter's background as a biologist fuels a deep interest in the animal world, not only as subjects, but as important links on the future of the environment.
1. Call of the Bison By Herb Mignery, bronze, on long-term loan from the Private Collection of Tia. 2. Spirit of American Youth by Donald H. Lue (1897-1988), bronze 3. Jaguars by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876-1973) Aluminium 1935 4. The Water Bearers by Glenna Goodacre (b. 1939) Bronze, 1985-1986. On long-term loan from the Private Collection of Tia. Glenna Goodacre often presenters scenes from Native American culture life in her sculpture. In 2002, Goodacre won the James Earle Fraser Sculpture Award at the Prix de West Exhibition. In 2003, she was awarded the Gold Medal for Career Achievement from the Portrait Society of America and was inducted into the Cowgirl Hall of Fame. Among her most significant commissions are the Vietnam Women's Memorial on the National Mall in Washington DC and the Irish Memorial in Philadelphia.
Jaguars by Anna Hyatt Huntington
The Water Bearers by Glenna Goodacre
Entrance to Bookgreen: Fighting Stallions by Anna Hyatt Huntington
Into the Unknown. Hermon Atkins MacNeil
Penguins by Albert Laessle
 Tidal Rhythm by Christopher Smith
1. Tidal Rhythm by Christopher Smith (b. 1958) 2. The Bather by Gwen Marcus (b. 1956) Bronze, 2005. Gift of John and Cookie Cloyd and others. As a child, Gwen Marcus studied with Clementine Spampinato and Bruno Lucchesi. She went on to attend the National Academy School of Fine Arts, Rhode Island School of Design, and the Art Students League. Marcus depicts diverse views of women. The Bather is also in the collections of the Chi Mei Museum, Taiwan, and Champs Hill, West Sussex, England as well as private collections in England and New York. 3. High Tide by Charles Cropper Parks (1922 - 2012) Bronze 1985. Gift of the family. Known for his engaging portraits of children, Parks embraced genre sculpture by placing his subjects in casual settings and activities, The prototype for this sculpture, titled Boy and Gulls, was first conceived in 1976 fir Mystic Seaport Museum in CT. The concept was remodeled in 1965 and enlarged to life-size.
Voratio by Jane B Armstrong
Diana Pond Brookgreen Gardens
Diana Pond
Fighting Stallions Closeup
The Bather by Gwen Marcus
The Hungry Loop by Herb Mignery
Boy and Girl Dolphins by Milton Horn
Boy and Girl Dolphins by Milton Horn
High Tide by Charles Cropper Parks