Europe Photos
My Favorite European Pictures!

These pictures were taken on five different trips, covering a period of about 6 years
Thanks for stopping by to share some memories with me.
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San Marco Square - Venice
St.Mark's Square was called "the drawing room of the world", for it has been the scene of some of the most important religious and political activities as well as the center of Venetian social life for almost a millennium.
Venice St. Marco Square
Chopin's Tomb
Père-Lachaise Cemetary - Paris
Of the twenty cemeteries in Paris, Père-Lachaise is the most famous. It has over 70,000 plots and receives some two million visitors a year from all over the world. Père-Lachaise is also the largest park in Paris.
Père-Lachaise Cemetary - Paris
The Blue Grotto
The Grotta Azzurra, on the Isle of Capri, is one of the most famous caves of the world, for it has a blue light shining through the salt water of the Mediterranean Sea which fills the cave with blue reflections. So the cave is called Grotta Azzurra which means Blue Grotto. Once it was called Gradola by the locals after the nearby landing place of Gradola. But it was avoided because it was said to be inhabited by witches and monsters. If you visit the cave by boat, you have to lie down on the bottom of it - in order to fit through the narrow natural opening.
Dachau Germany
One of the many stops we made in Germany was Dachau. The booklet we were given contained a letter from the Mayor. He realized people came to visit the Memorial Site of the former Concentration Camp. "After your visit you will be horror-stricken. But we sincerely hope you will not transfer your indignation to the ancient 1200-year-old-Bavarian town of Dachau, which was not consulted when the concentration camp was built and whose citizens voted quite decisively against the rise of National Socialism in 1933." The Camp is my most depressing memory of Europe, but rhe residents of the city were warm and welcoming.
The Grotta Azzurra Dachau Germany
Rodin Museum Paris
The Great French sculptor Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) had a profound influence on 20th-century sculpture. His works are distinguished by their stunning strength and realism. Rodin refused to ignore the negative aspects of humanity, and his works confront distress and moral weakness as well as passion and beauty. His statues St. John the Baptist Preaching, Eve, The Age of Bronze, and The Thinker are world famous.
Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace has served as the official London residence of Britain's sovereigns since 1837.Although in use for the many official events and receptions held by The Queen, areas of Buckingham Palace are opened to visitors on a regular basis.The present forecourt of the Palace, where Changing the Guard takes place (above) was formed in 1911, as part of the Victoria Memorial scheme. The gates and railings were also completed in 1911
Rodin Museum Paris
Buckingham Palace
Colosseum - Rome
In the ancient world, the elliptical-shaped Colosseum, taking ten years to build, was the largest structure of its type. It stood 160 feet high with four stories of windows, arches, and columns. Each of the three exterior floors consisted of 80 arches. As many as 50,000 spectators entered through 76 of the entrances on the ground level. During the Colosseum's opening ceremonies in A.D. 80, spectacles were held for 100 days in which hundreds of animals and 2,000 gladiators were killed.
Pompeii Italy
In A.D. 62 a terrible earthquake left Pompeii devastated. Those who survived this first disaster were rebuilding and in the process of completing its temples when the second and final disaster hit. . . the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. In A.D. 79, flames from the volcano shot into the sky, and an immense black cloud covered the sun. For three days, volcanic matter, and red-hot scoriae rained down on Pompeii. Artifacts and people were basically encased in the ash as it cooled. The survivors who may have first escaped the eruption were soon killed by a poisonous gas.
Colosseum - Rome Pompeii Italy
Bois de Boulogne
The charm of Bagatelle lies in its scenic variety; the water lilies, the big rocks and flowers, the footpaths in tunnels cut in the greenery, and big spaces planted with trees. These all combine to make it a park dear to the hearts of Parisians. A small château belongs to the City of Paris and is used for exhibitions, concerts and cultural events. We spent an entire magical day there.
Mt. Vesuvius - from the top
The development of Mt. Vesuvius has been studied since Roman times. The volcanic activity started about 10,000 years ago. Before the disastrous eruption of 79 AD that destroyed the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, Vesuvius had been quiet for 1200 years. Vesuvius has been active at irregular intervals, but has seldom remained quiet very long. The last major eruption occurred in 1944, but activity may start up at any time.
Mt. Vesuvius - from the top
Bois de Boulogne
Florence Italy
The most important art collection in Italy is located in Vasari’s majestic Uffizi Palace which houses the Medici art collection bequeathed to Florence in 1737, on the condition that it never leaves the city. Most people associate the city with Michelangelo’s David, carved from one block of marble in 1502 when Michelangelo was just 29 years old.
Florence Italy
Isle of Capri
Caesar Augustus bought this small island from the city of Naples in 79 BC. Legend asserts that Tiberius built twelve magnificent villas around the island, one for each of the gods of Olympus. Since its beginnings, Capri has captivated visitors with its peace and beauty. Many came and found themselves too enchanted to leave.
Isle of Capri
Notre Dame Cathedral
Set between the two arms of the river Seine, the lle de la Cité offers the passerby one of the most beautiful jewels of the French capital, and one of Europe's masterpieces of Gothic architecture: the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris. This was taken from a boat on the Seine.
Notre Dame Cathedral
Naples, Italy
View from Paradiso Hotel
Lying on the Gulf of Naples, the city stretches from the outlying slopes of Campi Flegrei to Vesuvius, in one of the most outstanding scenic settings in the Mediterranean. It was quite a hike from the Bay to the hotel, but the bueses ran several times a day.
Naples, Italy
Copenhagen Denmark
Despite having evolved into a major capital, Copenhagen is still a small city. The medieval town and the new bridge districts, located on the site of Copenhagen's ramparts until the mid- 1800s, make up a harmonious whole. And not only is the water essential to the city's prosperity, it also frames the city.
Copenhagen Denmark Little Mermaid Copenhagen
Hans Christian Andersen wrote a fairy tale about her; Disney produced the movie; and Copenhagen maintains a statue in her honour which continues to be the largest tourist attraction in Denmark and the most photographed statue in the world.
Little Mermaid Copenhagen
Tivoli Gardens and Palace
Copenhagen has been the capital of Denmark for 600 years and is also the largest city in Scandinavia. Tivoli amusement Park began operating in 1843.
Tivoli Gardens and Palace Kronborg in Elsinore
Kronborg in Elsinore, on the seaward approach to the Sound, is one of north Europe’s most important Renaissance castles. It is also the most famous castle in Denmark, known all over the world from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, and it is visited every year by approx. 200,000 tourists.
Kronborg Castke in Elsinore
Glockenspiel at Munich Germany
Pictured ar right, is the Glockenspiel in downtown Munich, Germany. The 279 ft tower houses a Glockenspiel consisting of 43 bells. At 11:00, 12:00, 5:00 and 11:00 PM daily, the bells are accompanied by mechanical marionettes that perform scenes from Munich's history.
Glockenspiel at Munich Germany Munich Germany
The 1972 Munich Games were setting records in all categories. They were supposed to celebrate peace. But in the 10th day, the early morning of 5 September, eight Palestinian terrorists broke into the Olympic Village, killed two members of the Israeli team and took nine more hostage. In an ensuing battle, all nine Israeli hostages were killed, as were five of the terrorists and one policeman. All other details about the Munich Games pale in significance.
Munich Germany
Luxembourg Palace
The gardens of Luxembourg surround the Luxembourg Palace. This large park, which has sprawling lawns and abundant flowers, always astonishes its visitors with its harmonious paths and the beauty of its flowers. The 60 acre oasis offers a breath of fresh air to anyone fortunate to have entered its gates. You'll find 80 statues including a point-sized Statue of Liberty, formal gravel paths, manicured lawns and a profusion of trees and seasonal flowers.There's even an open-air café.
Luxembourg Palace
Neuschwanstein Castle
The castle of Neuschwanstein is a romantic dream castle. It’s no surprise that this castle served as the inspiration for Walt Disney’s Cinderella Castle. Located in Germany’s Bavarian Alps, this castle is a manifestation of the fertile imagination of King Louis II of Bavaria. Neuschwanstein is 3,165 feet up, accessible by a single road. (And it was a l-o-n-g walk!) King Louis II of Bavaria has become part of historical lore, mostly due to the construction of three castles, all products of his fertile imagination: Linderhof, Herrenchiemsee and Neuschwanstein.
Neuschwanstein Castle
Montmartre Sacré-Coeur
Begun in 1875 to celebrate Paris' delivery from the Prussian siege, the domed white Neo-Byzantine basilica of Sacré-Coeur crowns Paris' highest hill. The dome of Sacre-Coeur can be reached by a climb of 237 steps. Montmartre has long been famous for its artists. This is the place to come if you want to get your portrait drawn or invest in some original art. Walk around this small square and look over the shoulder of an artist as he draws someone; or drink a coffee at one of the cafes which line every inch of the square.
Montmartre Sacré-Coeur
Rialto Bridge Venice
With an unforgettable view over the Grand Canal, flanked by over 200 breathtaking palaces The Rialto Bridge's 24-foot arch was designed to allow passage of galleys, and the massive structure was built on some 12,000 wooden pilings that still support the bridge more than 400 years later.The architect, Antonio da Ponte ("Anthony of the Bridge," appropriately enough), competed against such eminent designers as Michelangelo and Palladio for the contract.
Rialto Bridge Venice
Versailles France
Trevi Fountain, Rome
Legend says that if you toss a coin over your shoulder into the Trevi fountain , you will one day return to the Eternal City. I've done this many times, so I'm expecting lots of return !
Trevi Fountain, Rome
Versailles France
Over the centuries the Palace of Versailles has come to be synonymous with a luxurious standard of living.The fabulous interiors of Versailles are not the only things of interest to art and architecture lovers. The extensive palace grounds are beautiful to walk around in and dozens of artists have carved sculptures and fountains along the many garden pathways.
Spanish Steps Rome
The Spanish Steps are one of the landmarks of Rome.The piazza below has always been a favorite haunt of tourists. John Keats, the famous poet, died in the house on the right of the Steps.
Spanish Steps Rome
Vatican City
Vatican City
The Holy See is the smallest independent country in the world. St Peter's Basilica is the center of the Roman Catholic faith, with the great St Peter's Square in front of it.The Sistine Chapel has famous ceiling frescoes painted by Michelangelo and restored in the 1980s.
Monaco
Prince Rainier III's fairytale marriage to movie star Grace Kelly in 1956 was the icing on the cake for the glamourous Principality of Monaco. When the royal family is made up of leggy models and drop-dead gorgeous screen stars, representative democracy seems a tad dull in comparison.
Monaco
Stockholm Sweden
Stockholm is like no other capital in the world. Built on fourteen islands, it rises gracefully from water so clean that you can go swimming or fishing in the very heart of the city. Its waterfront is alive with boats, ferries to shuttle you around the city, to sailboats and yachts that cruise out into the vast archipelago that stretches into the Baltic.
Stockholm Sweden
Small Statue of Liberty Paris
A small replica of our Statue of Liberty can be seen in Paris. It's on a small island in the middle of the Seine, west of the Eiffel Tower and next to the Pont de Grenelle, a modern bridge crossing the river near the Radio France building.
Statue of Liberty Paris
Louvre Museum Paris
Salzburg Austria
Take an informal survey of the most beautiful cities in Europe and Salzburg is sure to come out near the top. Most who visit Salzburg do so from late July to late August to take advantage of the city's famous Salzburg Festival. The city's most famous resident, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born here in 1756.
Salzburg Austria
Louvre Museum Paris
Chinese-born American architect I. M. Pei designed this controversial glass pyramid (completed in 1989) at the entrance to the Louvre. Most famous selections are: Winged Victory of Samothrace , Venus de Milo, The Seated Scribe, Madonna and Child and St. John the Baptist, The Great Sphinx, Mona Lisa, Seaport at Sunset, The Gleaners, Paradise .
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